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18 Cruelty-Free Brands Owned by a Company That Test on Animals

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Whenever there’s news of a cruelty-free brand getting acquired by a company that tests on animals, many caring consumers are left frustrated and heart broken as they decide to support or boycott these cruelty-free brands under its new, non-cruelty-free owners.

Some people choose to boycott and avoid buying from brands that are owned or have been acquired by a corporation that chooses to test on animals for a number of reasons, which I discuss in more detail in this post, but I find the #1 reason is because they feel that their money is financially supporting and funding more animal tests done by the parent company.

On the flip side, some people choose to continue to buy from cruelty-free brands that are owned by a parent company that tests on animals because they believe it’ll show the parent company that there’s a high consumer demand for cruelty-free brands and hopefully they can see that and it’ll incentivize them to stop testing on animals altogether.

There isn’t a “right” or “wrong” answer and as consumers, we’re at liberty to buy from whichever brands we want but I think it’s equally important to familiarize ourselves with some of the cruelty-free brands that are under the same umbrella as a parent company that chooses to test on animals.

Keep scrolling to find 18 beauty and household brands that are cruelty-free however they are owned by a company that tests on animals!

Hourglass

Hourglass was acquired by Unilever in 2017 and remains to be certified cruelty-free by PETA  This brand is PETA certified cruelty-free. Hourglass’ animal testing statement (2017) reads:

“As a cruelty-free brand, Hourglass does not incorporate animal testing into our development phase or at the production level. We do not provide authorization to any third parties to perform animal testing on our products. In addition, Hourglass does not retail within any country that requires animal testing.”


IT Cosmetics

IT Cosmetics was acquired by L’Oreal in 2016 for $1.2 billion (source) and remains to be certified cruelty-free by PETA  This brand is PETA certified cruelty-free. IT Cosmetic’s animal testing statement (2017) reads:

“IT Cosmetics™ is certified by PETA as a 100% cruelty-free brand, and you will find us listed on their website. Remaining a cruelty-free brand is extremely important to us, as it is to so many of you! IT Cosmetics™ has never tested products on animals, nor do we use animal hair in our brushes—and we have absolutely no plans to change that.”


Too Faced

Too Faced was acquired by Estée Lauder in 2016 for $1.45 billion (source) and remains to be certified cruelty-free by PETA  This brand is PETA certified cruelty-free. Too Faced’s animal testing statement (2017) reads:

“…Too Faced loves animals! Our products are totally cruelty-free. In fact, our brushes are made with the softest and gentlest teddy-bear hair”


BECCA Cosmetics

BECCA Cosmetics was acquired by Estée Lauder in 2016 for roughly $200 million (source). BECCA’s animal testing statement (2017) reads:

“BECCA is and will remain a cruelty-free company. We do not test our products on animals and we will continue to hold true to this principle.”


Seventh Generation

Seventh Generation was acquired by Unilever in 2016 and remains to be certified cruelty-free by PETA This brand is PETA certified cruelty-free and Leaping Bunny This brand is Leaping Bunny Certified. Seventh Generation’s animal testing statement (2017) reads:

“We are proud, that since our company’s founding in 1988, we have never, ever, conducted or commissioned any animal testing of our products or their ingredients.”


Dermalogica

Dermalogica was acquired by Unilever in 2015 and remains to be certified cruelty-free by PETA This brand is PETA certified cruelty-free and Leaping Bunny This brand is Leaping Bunny Certified. Dermalogica’s animal testing statement (2017) reads:

“No, we do not engage in animal testing, nor do our formulas contain animal-derived ingredients. We are recognized as cruelty-free by Leaping Bunny and PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals). Further, we have been recognized by the RSPO (Roundtable of Sustainable Palm Oil) for sourcing palm oil in a manner that does not negatively impact local wildlife.”


Murad

Murad was acquired by Unilever in 2015 and remains to be certified cruelty-free by PETA  This brand is PETA certified cruelty-free. Murad’s animal testing statement (2017) reads:

“Murad never tests any products on animals and uses only ingredients that have not been animal tested. We only test on humans. We do sell our products in Hong Kong but not mainland China so we are not required to test on animals.”


Ren

Ren was acquired by Unilever in 2015 and remains to be certified cruelty-free by PETA  This brand is PETA certified cruelty-free. Ren’s animal testing statement (2017) reads:

“We do not test any of our products on animals. Our products are not tested on animals on our behalf by any third party.

It is unfortunately the case that every ingredient used in all skincare products would have been tested on animals at some point in the past by the ingredient supplier prior to the ingredient being licensed for use in cosmetic products. However, we are delighted to report that the European Commission has implemented a marketing ban on any cosmetic products that have been tested on animals or contain ingredients that were tested on animals after 11th March 2013. This means that any products that are tested on animals after this date or contain ingredients that were tested on animals after this date are now banned from sale in the EU.”


Tarte

Tarte was acquired by Kose in 2014 for $135 million (source) and remains to be certified cruelty-free by PETA  This brand is PETA certified cruelty-free. Tarte’s animal testing statement (2017) reads:

“tarte cosmetics is a cruelty-free cosmetics line. tarte makeup and skincare is never tested on animals.”


NYX Cosmetics

NYX Cosmetics was acquired by L’Oreal in 2014 for $500 million (source) and remains to be certified cruelty-free by PETA  This brand is PETA certified cruelty-free. NYX Cosmetics’ animal testing statement (2017) reads:

“NYX Professional Makeup is certified and acknowledged by organizations, such as PETA, as a cruelty-free brand. We are committed to producing 100% cruelty-free cosmetics. We do not test any of our products on animals.”


Urban Decay

Urban Decay was acquired by L’Oreal in 2012 for an estimated $300-$400 million (source) and remains to be certified cruelty-free by PETA  This brand is PETA certified cruelty-free and although they claim to be certified by Leaping Bunny, however I could not find Urban Decay listed in Leaping Bunny’s online directory. Urban Decay’s animal testing statement (2017) reads:

“Urban Decay is a cruelty-free brand and is committed to ending animal testing. We do not test our products on animals, nor do we allow others to test on our behalf. Additionally, we require our suppliers to certify that the raw materials used in the manufacture of our products are not tested on animals. Our Brand is certified by both PETA and The Leaping Bunny Program (CCIC) as cruelty-free.”


Smashbox

Smashbox was acquired by Estée Lauder in 2010 for an estimated $200-300 million (source) and remains to be certified cruelty-free by PETA  This brand is PETA certified cruelty-free. Smashbox’s animal testing statement (2017) reads:

“We live for lipstick and are serious about primers—but we also really care about animals. That’s why we are cruelty-free. We test our products on human volunteers, not animals.”


bareMinerals

bareMinerals was acquired by Shiseido in 2010 for $1.7 billion (source) and remains to be certified cruelty-free by PETA  This brand is PETA certified cruelty-free. bareMinerals’ animal testing statement (2017) reads:

“Please feel at ease when using bareMinerals products as we do not test on animals. We also do not work with any manufacturers that do animal testing. bareMinerals natural haired brushes are made of Goat and Pony. Please note that no animals are harmed in the process of making our brushes. For our customers who chose not to use animal haired brushes we do offer a variety of high end synthetic brushes.”


Burt’s Bees

Burt’s Bees was acquired by Clorox in 2007 for $925 million (source) and remains to be certified cruelty-free by PETA  This brand is PETA certified cruelty-free and Leaping Bunny This brand is Leaping Bunny Certified. Burt’s Bees’ animal testing statement (2017) reads:

“Burt’s Bees does not test its products on animals nor do we ask others to do so on our behalf. You’ll see the Leaping Bunny seal on our packaging to reinforce our commitment. Please know we are absolutely committed to our no animal testing policy.”

PureOlogy

PureOlogy was acquired by L’Oreal in 2007 and remains to be certified cruelty-free by PETA  This brand is PETA certified cruelty-free. Found on PureOlogy’s website, their animal testing statement (2017) reads:

The questions of animal testing.

Our consumers’ health and safety have always been an absolute priority for L’Oréal. As is the support of animal welfare.

L’Oréal has developed a very rigorous safety evaluation procedure of its products, backed by research. Well before the question of animal testing was raised by civil society or within a regulatory framework, L’Oréal has been committed to new methods of assessing safety that don’t involve animals. A true pioneer, L’Oréal has been reconstructing human skin models in laboratories to elaborate safety tests since 1979, as an alternative to animals. In 1989, L’Oréal completely ceased testing its products on animals, thus 14 years before the regulation required so. Since 2013, L’Oréal has completely stopped testing ingredients on animals.

Only one exception remains for L’Oréal just like all other cosmetic companies: the health authorities in China require some tests on animals for certain products or ingredients. L’Oréal has been committed to working alongside the Chinese authorities and scientists to have alternative testing methods recognized, and permit the cosmetic regulation to evolve towards a total and definite elimination of animal testing. Thanks to this, since 2014, certain products manufactured and sold in China like shampoo, body wash or make-up are no longer tested on animals.


Bumble & Bumble

Bumble & Bumble was acquired by Estée Lauder in 2007 (source) and remains to be certified cruelty-free by PETA  This brand is PETA certified cruelty-free. Bumble & Bumble’s animal testing statement (2017) reads:

“Bumble and bumble, LLC. is committed to the elimination of animal testing. We are equally committed to consumer health and safety, and bringing to market products that comply with applicable regulations in every country in which our products are sold.

We do not conduct animal testing on our products or ingredients, nor ask others to test on our behalf, except when required by law. We evaluate our finished products in clinical tests on volunteer panels.

Bumble and bumble, LLC. fully supports the development and global acceptance of non-animal testing alternatives. To this end, the Company works extensively with the industry at large and the global scientific community to research and fund these alternatives.”


Tom’s of Maine

Tom’s of Maine was acquired by Colgate in 2006 for $100 million (source) and remains to be certified cruelty-free by PETA  This brand is PETA certified cruelty-free. Tom’s of Maine’s animal testing statement (2017) reads:

“…Tom’s products are 100% cruelty free — no animal testing and no animal ingredients….As pioneers in cruelty free products and policies, we expect the same from our suppliers, partners and organizations we support.”


Aveda

Aveda was acquired by Estée Lauder in 1997 for $300 million (source) and remains to be certified cruelty-free by PETA  This brand is PETA certified cruelty-free. Aveda’s animal testing statement (2017) reads:

“Aveda is a cruelty-free brand. We do not test on animals and never ask others to do so on our behalf. Our products are “people-tested.””


Buxom

Buxom is owned by Shiseido and remains to be certified cruelty-free by PETA  This brand is PETA certified cruelty-free. Buxom’s animal testing statement (2017) reads:

“Please feel at ease when using Buxom Cosmetics products as we do not test on animals. We also do not work with any manufacturers that do animal testing. Buxom Cosmetics natural haired brushes are made of Goat and Pony. Please note that no animals are harmed in the process of making our brushes. For our customers who chose not to use animal haired brushes we do offer a variety of high end synthetic brushes.”

5 Responses
  • Leslie
    October 10, 2017

    Thank you so much for publishing this list. I’m new at the whole cruelty free ‘thing’ and this list is a great help. Although I’m crushed to see Tarte on it. The only truly waterproof mascara I’ve found….ugh! I work in a hot sweaty kitchen and have struggled to find one that truly works. Tarte Also has a great eye shadow pallet without a whole bunch of outrageous colors or shimmery tones. I was thrilled when I found it. I’ve tried some others, but they still smudge a bit. I like others here are not big online shoppers, so if I can’t get it at Target, Walmart, or Sephora then I just wind up settling on anything, being disappointed and then throwing it and my money away.
    What’s your take on the new line by Rhianna….I’ve heard it’s cruelty free, although I would imagine it’s sold in China.
    Many Thanks,
    Leslie

  • Linda
    October 5, 2017

    Thank you for posting this. I find it so hard to go to places like Target and find brands that aren’t tested either themselves or by parent companies. I have such a limited access and I’m not a huge online shopper.

    • Vicky Ly
      October 6, 2017

      I totally get ya… I’m usually not a huge online shopper as well, especially when it comes to buying makeup online! I’ll work on a list of cruelty-free brands (with vegan options!) available at Target, for you and other caring consumers who are in the same boat! =)

  • Helen
    October 5, 2017

    Of the brands I’ve heard of, I knew most of them had animal testing parent companies but I didn’t know about Murad which is disappointing as they are my favourite luxury brand.
    I avoid parent companies when possible, especially Unilever, Proctor & Gamble and L’Oreal as they are major animal abusers.
    Luckily I only have 1 Murad product at the moment and it’s almost ran out.
    In a way this is a good thing as it will make me search for a totally cruelty free replacement.

    • Vicky Ly
      October 6, 2017

      Totally! One of the benefits of going cruelty-free is that we get to try out a bunch of new products you wouldn’t have otherwise tried! =) I totally know what you mean, I also try to stay away from buying anything associated with those corporations too… and besides, there’s so many amazing independently owned cruelty-free beauty brands to choose from now!! hehe

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