The most important thing 😂🌿✨
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(via @kevinfarzad)

The most important thing 😂🌿✨...

vegan & ethical at-home manicure essentials featuring some of my favorite colors from @kesterblack 💅🏻🌿
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From left to right:
𝘘𝘶𝘢𝘳𝘵𝘻 - Greyed Purple Nail Polish
𝘗𝘦𝘵𝘳𝘢 - Sandy Pale Pink Nail Polish
𝘛𝘩𝘦 𝘍𝘶𝘵𝘶𝘳𝘦 𝘪𝘴 𝘍𝘦𝘮𝘢𝘭𝘦 - Blush Pink Nail Polish
𝘗𝘦𝘵𝘢𝘭 - Hazy Blush Nail Polish
𝘕𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘳 𝘕𝘶𝘥𝘦 - Rose Nude Nail Polish
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🌸 Kester Black is a high-performing, ethical & sustainable beauty brand! All of their products are:
💗 100% vegan + cruelty-free
💗 10-Free nail polish formula
💗 water permeable & breathable nail polish
💗 beautiful & thoughtful packaging using recyclable materials
💗 manufactured in small batches to minimize wastage
💗 the first beauty brand in the world to be B Corp certified
💗 all products are manufactured in Australia
💗 office uses renewable energy and is paperless
💗 carbon-neutral; carbon footprint is zero! 🙌🏻
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#kesterblack #kesterblackcolour #mykesterblack #gifted

vegan & ethical at-home manicure...

Hanging in there 🌿 and I hope you are too. 🙏🏻✨ #alonetogether
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𝚃𝚒𝚖𝚎𝚜 𝚖𝚊𝚢 𝚋𝚎 𝚝𝚘𝚞𝚐𝚑, 𝚋𝚞𝚝 𝚜𝚘 𝚊𝚛𝚎 𝚢𝚘𝚞.
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(📸 via @theeverygirl)

Hanging in there 🌿 and...

𝕖𝕒𝕥 𝕄𝕆ℝ𝔼 𝕡𝕝𝕒𝕟𝕥𝕤 🥬 〰️ (📸 via @gabbois)
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I actually wouldn't be surprised if they started making vegan ice cream out of cauliflower soon! 😬✨🌱

𝕖𝕒𝕥 𝕄𝕆ℝ𝔼 𝕡𝕝𝕒𝕟𝕥𝕤 🥬 〰️...

✦ 𝙡𝙞𝙫𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙮𝙤𝙪𝙣𝙜, 𝙬𝙞𝙡𝙙, 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙘𝙧𝙪𝙚𝙡𝙩𝙮-𝙛𝙧𝙚𝙚 ✦
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(📷 via @theveggiest)

✦ 𝙡𝙞𝙫𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙮𝙤𝙪𝙣𝙜, 𝙬𝙞𝙡𝙙, 𝙖𝙣𝙙...

If you’re new to vegan beauty or makeup, I highly recommend giving a seasonal subscription service, like @vegancuts Makeup Box a try! 💄🌻✨
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Every 3 months, you’ll receive a box full of vegan makeup delivered right to your doorstep 📦
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Reasons to subscribe to #VegancutsMakeupBox:
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🌼 you get to experiment and try new vegan products and brands!
🌼 it’s cheaper than buying each product on their own — you get full-size products (not dinky samples), usually over $100+ in value but you only pay $37-$55. The price depends on where it’s being shipped to (US, Canada, or International) and the length of the subscription.
🌼 in addition to all of the products being cruelty-free and vegan, they’re also natural and non-toxic.
🌼 you get to customize the box and pick colors that suit you best!
🌼 it’s a seasonal subscription so you’ll be sent products that go with the change in season and weather.
🌼 do good while looking good — partial proceeds from each Vegancuts Spring Makeup Box goes towards Wildlife Victoria rescue in Australia to help animals affected by the horrific bush fires.
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🌿 Use #Vegancuts Coupon Code: 'ETHICALELEPHANT' to receive $5 OFF your order.

If you’re new to vegan...

Sunday mood 〰️🌿 Got any recommendations for low or zero-waste + vegan skincare brands? ✨
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(illustration 🎨 via @nicolajanecreative)

Sunday mood 〰️🌿 Got any...

You are not alone 〰️ We’re in this together 💖 (📸 via @glitterguide)

You are not alone 〰️...

⚡︎ 𝙎𝙐𝙋𝙋𝙊𝙍𝙏 𝙑𝙀𝙂𝘼𝙉 𝘽𝙐𝙎𝙄𝙉𝙀𝙎𝙎 ✧ Now more than ever, they need our support. You can always show your support without spending💲by leaving them a review, liking, commenting, sharing their posts, or just simply sending them an encouraging note during these uncertain times. 🌿 Show some of your vegan businesses some love by TAGGING @ them in the comments! ⬇️
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Some of my cherished vegan businesses 👉🏻 @siennabyronbay @nclabeauty @motd_cosmetics @nolaskinsentials @kesterblack @inikaorganic @elatecosmetics
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📸 Also, be sure to check out 〰️ @brightzine 👇🏻
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Community is everything, and in these uncertain times, we need it more than ever. That’s why we have launched the Support Vegan Business Hub; a space to help vegan businesses with key information, news and resources to safeguard their businesses through this pandemic. We’ll be sharing resources to help businesses, as well as ways that we can all support our vegan traders at this time. Stay tuned for lots of information as this progresses over on thebrightclub.co ⚡️

⚡︎ 𝙎𝙐𝙋𝙋𝙊𝙍𝙏 𝙑𝙀𝙂𝘼𝙉 𝘽𝙐𝙎𝙄𝙉𝙀𝙎𝙎 ✧...

Please read till the end 🌿 I recently bought these plant-based scour pads from @fullcircle, they're made from walnut shells and non-toxic materials 🧽 They work almost as good as plastic/synthetic scour pads and does the job of gently removing most dirt while not scratching my pans ⭐️ They were also made in Canada 🇨🇦 and Full Circle is certified B Corporation with a commitment to reduce their environmental impact, claiming their products use less energy and emit fewer greenhouse gases in production. 🌱 This all sounded great, which was why I bought them as I wanted a plastic-free and compostable alternative -- BUT, upon further research.. their website states their walnut shell scour pads are made of: Walnut shells AND recycled plastic! 😔 Making them actually NOT compostable.
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Ahh yes, I should have done more research before buying and also, why wasn't recycled plastic listed on their packaging!?
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On the surface, these may be a better option than other synthetic scour pads or sponges on the market as it's made from *recycled* plastic but I totally fell for the greenwashing here. Yes -- I, too make mistakes! 😬 I'm posting this mishap of mine to show you that living sustainably is a journey, and lessons will be learned along the way. This has taught me to do more research than just reading the product's packaging or an online retailer's product description before buying... And now that I know better, I can do better! 🌿
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🌻 What eco-friendly or plastic-free sponges do u recommend?

Please read till the end...

Cruelty-free vs. Vegan – What’s the Difference?

This post may contain affiliate links.

The terms “cruelty-free” and “vegan” have grown increasingly popular in just the last couple of years as consumer demand for animal cruelty-free cosmetics rises and the influx of new cosmetic products touting the “cruelty-free” and “vegan” labels from both indie and mainstream brands. But did you know there’s a difference between cruelty-free and vegan?

The two labels are often used interchangeably, by both companies and consumers, but they actually don’t mean the same thing.

It can be confusing trying to navigate through the cruelty-free and vegan beauty space but let me help break it down for you.

What’s the difference between cruelty-free vs vegan? Short Answer: “Cruelty-Free” generally implies no animal testing occurred whereas “Vegan” generally implies the products do not contain any animal-derived ingredients or by-products.

A product can be both, or one but not the other. This is a concept I’m going to dive in deeper with real-life examples down below.

Quick note, I’m using the term ‘generally’ here because this is generally how the beauty industry uses these two labels. If it was up to me and I got to make up the rules, I wouldn’t classify something as being vegan if it was tested on animals (cruelty-free). But unfortunately, I don’t make the rules so it’s important we learn and stay informed on how the industry and companies are using these labels today.

What’s the Difference: Cruelty-Free and Vegan?

Let’s start with some fun venn diagrams (remember those?)

Remember, the label “cruelty-free” means = this product and its ingredients were not tested on animals. And the label “vegan” means = this product does not contain animal products or ingredients.

We’ll start with the basics, when a product is labelled as both “cruelty-free and vegan”

Cosmetics claiming to be cruelty-free and vegan explained
Cosmetics claiming to be cruelty-free and vegan

Can something be called cruelty-free AND vegan

When a product claims to be both ‘cruelty-free and vegan’, it means it was not tested on animals and it does not contain animal products or ingredients.

Real life example: Pacifica Beauty has a cruelty-free and vegan lipstick. This means the lipstick from Pacifica was not tested on animals and does not contain any animal-derived ingredients or by-products.


Cosmetics claiming to be cruelty-free, but not vegan explained
Cosmetics claiming to be cruelty-free, but not vegan

Can something be cruelty-free but NOT vegan?

If a product claims to be ‘cruelty-free but not vegan’, it means the product was not tested on animals but it does contain some animal-derived ingredients or by-products.

Real life example: Milani Cosmetics has a cruelty-free lipstick but it is not vegan. This means the lipstick from Milani was not tested on animals, but it does contain some animal-derived ingredients or by-products like beeswax, carmine, or lanolin.


Now this leaves us with the last option,

Cosmetics that are vegan, but not cruelty-free explained
Cosmetics that are vegan, but not cruelty-free

Can something be vegan but NOT cruelty-free?

Here’s where it gets a little confusing and counter-intuitive. But bear with me.

Products that claim to be ‘vegan’ but may not be ‘cruelty-free’ means the product does not contain animal products or animal-derived ingredients but sadly, the products or its ingredients may have been tested on animals.

Real life example: Garnier claims their Ultimate Blends and new Fructis hair products are ‘vegan’, explaining how these products do not contain animal-derived ingredients or by-products. But Garnier is actually not a cruelty-free brand, as Garnier does test on animals when required by law¹.

Garnier claims their Ultimate Blends products are vegan, but Garnier is not cruelty-free
Garnier claims their Ultimate Blends products are vegan, but Garnier is not cruelty-free

Another real-life example: In 2017, L’Oreal’s EverPure Shampoo and Conditioners were spotted with a ‘100% Vegan’ stamp on the packaging. L’Oreal claims these products are ‘vegan’ in which they don’t contain animal-derived ingredients or by-products, but L’Oreal is definitely not a cruelty-free brand. L’Oreal does test on animals when required by law.²

L'Oreal claims their Ever hair products are 100% vegan, but L'Oreal is not cruelty-free.
L’Oreal claims their Ever hair products are 100% vegan, but L’Oreal is not cruelty-free.

Isn’t it Illegal for Brands to Lie About Being Cruelty-Free/Vegan?

How is it possible for L’Oreal and Garnier to tout claims of being “vegan” and “cruelty-free” when they’re not? and can’t they be sued for lying to us? I hear ya.

Sadly, there is no standard or legal definitions for the labels “cruelty-free” and “vegan”. This means companies can use these labels in whichever way they like without any consequences or liability. This is why it’s important we stay informed on what these labels mean and who may be misleading or deceiving us.

If you’re thinking, ain’t nobody got time for dat! then you’ll be happy to hear that there are currently 4 certifying organizations who all audits and accredits companies/products that are both cruelty-free and vegan. When you spot their logos on a product packaging, it means the issuing organization has verified that this product/company does not test on animals and do not use animal products or animal-derived in their products.

List of Cruelty-free and Vegan Certifications for Cosmetics
List of Cruelty-free and Vegan Certifications for Cosmetics

For further reading on what each of these logos and other “cruelty-free” and “vegan” logos and claims mean, check out this post here that explains it all!


¹ Garnier products are sold in mainland China where all imported cosmetics are required by law to be tested on animals. Garnier claims, “Garnier is in China with a few Ultimate Blends products only. And these products are part of the nonfunctional products category, which is no longer subject to animal testing since 2014.” Although China may not require pre-market animal testing on ordinary, domestically-produced cosmetics anymore, China may still conduct post-market animal testing on products that are sold in their country. Post-market testing is where Chinese officials will pull products off of store shelves and test them on animals, this is often times done without the company’s knowledge or consent. At this time, any cosmetic brand that is selling its products in-stores in mainland China cannot be considered cruelty-free because of the risks and possibility of post-market animal testing.

² Similar to Garnier, L’Oreal products are sold throughout mainland China where animal testing is required by law for all imported cosmetics. Although L’Oreal can make claims that they are not conducting these animal tests themselves, but they are consenting and paying the Chinese authorities to test on their behalf in order to sell within their country. L’Oreal is not considered cruelty-free by our standards.

What do you think?

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29 Comments
  • Kamilla
    January 20, 2020

    Can you be vegan but use cruelty-free ingredients?

  • Jamie
    July 26, 2019

    Hello,

    I am writing in hopes that you please revise this website.

    Any product which is certified vegan, must not have been tested on animals, pre- OR post-market. In other words, neither the producer, nor various 3rd-party suppliers, are permitted to test vegan products on animals. Juice Beauty, for instance, is 100% certified vegan. That means that they would not sell to any supplier, a country such as China, for instance, because its government would require animal testing.

    So, to sum it up, you can have a cruelty free company whose products contain animal byproducts. But vegan products are always cruelty free.

    • Vicky Ly
      July 26, 2019

      Hi Jamie,

      Yes, *certified* vegan products are both not tested on animals and do not contain any animal ingredients.

      But not all vegan products are *certified*. To become certified is a voluntary process that companies are not mandatory to undergo in order to label their products as “vegan”. If cosmetic companies wish to become *certified* vegan, then they must go through the process and register their products with an accompanying organization like Vegan Society, Vegan Action, or PETA. And once approved, these *certified* vegan products are deemed as not tested on animals AND do not contain animal products.

      This is a guide on how the cosmetics industry generally uses the term “cruelty-free” and “vegan”. And I’ve provided two solid real-life examples of L’Oreal and Garnier claiming their products are “vegan” when in fact, these two beauty brands DO test on animals.

      I get what you’re saying and agree with you but unfortunately, this isn’t how the cosmetics industry are using the labels “cruelty-free” and “vegan” and so the point of this post is to educate ethical shoppers so that they don’t get duped by brands like L’Oreal and Garnier who are trying to pass their products off as being “vegan” when they’re not since they DO currently test on animals.

    • Vicky Ly
      July 26, 2019

      And also, Juice Beauty isn’t a certified vegan brand. Two of their products contains organic honey and/or beeswax and are not suitable for vegans.

      Juice Beauty is certfied cruelty-free but not certified vegan, as you claimed.

      • Ana Tascon
        August 16, 2019

        Hi Vicky,

        Our company is interested in getting Cruelty free certification through PETA, but it have been very difficult the communication with them, it takes too long to get replay. Do you know somebody that have go through this process?

  • Inez
    October 23, 2018

    “Some products do not contain any animal ingredients (like beeswax or carmine)”

    Carmine ís an animal, it are squished lice.

  • Sylvie Ficco
    April 22, 2018

    I want to go vegan
    I want to use vegan and cruelty free products but I might not be able to do that because of a money issue as I am still in High school and live with my mom. My family is low income and for hygiene products my mom buys whatever is on sale. What should I do?

    • Melanie
      April 3, 2019

      Elf, Love Beauty And Planet, Wet N Wild and Palmer’s are some good and cheap cruelty-free options you can suggest to your mom. CVS brand products are cruelty-free, too. Hang in there!

  • Jas Chahal
    February 28, 2018

    Thank you Vicky, people like you make me believe in a future where animals will have rights, every woman and man should live a cruelty-free lifestyle and help end horrific slaughter houses, thanks for your vegan information for product searching, keep sharing and educating people xx

  • arth
    January 26, 2018

    good post

  • Raquel
    January 22, 2018

    Hi Vicky my concern leans more on toxicity – there are vegan products that rate poorly by the Environmental Working Group because of toxic ingredients. Would you post on that topic please?

“Make ethical choices in what we buy, do, and watch. In a consumer-driven society our individual choices, used collectively for the good of animals and nature, can change the world faster than laws.”― Marc Bekoff

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List of Cruelty-Free, Water-based Nail Polish
Cruelty-free vs. Vegan – What’s the Difference?