Weleda

Last Updated: January 7, 2022

Is Weleda Cruelty-Free and Vegan?

Make a positive impact by supporting companies with the same values and ethics as what matters most to you. To navigate and find ethical brands, here’s a summary of Weleda’s ethics and initiatives.

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Ethical Analysis

Is Weleda cruelty-free, vegan, or sustainable? We’ve got the answers here! Read below for more details on Weleda’s policies.
Weleda is cruelty-free. None of Weleda’s ingredients, formulations, or finished products are tested on animals, anywhere in the world.
Not all of Weleda’s products are vegan but they have some vegan options.
Weleda claims they use “organic, biodynamic, or wild-crafted (from wild plants) whenever possible.” And they also claim their NATRUE-certified products are “produced using sustainable production processes and environmentally friendly practices.” And as part of Weleda’s sustainability initiatives, they implement practices to reduce their water and energy consumption and they offer a recycling program in partnership with TerraCycle.
Weleda products come in plastic and glass packaging. They also offer a recycling program in partnership with TerraCycle.

About Weleda

In Switzerland 1921, Weleda was founded on the belief that people are part of nature, grounded in a commitment to carefully orchestrate formulas that work with the body’s rhythms to awaken skin’s natural functions.
COMPANY BASED IN: Switzerland
PRODUCTS MADE IN: Switzerland, France, Germany
PRODUCTS: Skincare, Bath & Body Care, Oral Care
CERTIFICATIONS: N/A

Weleda

This post may contain affiliate links that at no additional cost to you, I may earn a small commission.

You can find Weleda cruelty-free products at weleda.com, Ulta, Target, Dermstore, Walmart, iHerb, and Amazon.

Weleda is Cruelty-Free

Weleda has confirmed they do not test their products or ingredients on animals or ask others to test on their behalf. Their suppliers also do not test on animals, nor do they allow their products to be tested on animals when required by law.

By our standards, we would consider Weleda to be Cruelty-Free.

Below is a screenshot of what’s currently stated on Weleda’s website about its animal testing policy:

Weleda Cruelty-Free Claims

What About China’s Animal Testing Laws?

As of May 1, 2021, some imported ordinary cosmetics can be exempt from animal testing under certain conditions. However, for the most part, animal testing is still legally required for most imported cosmetics in 2022.

Weleda states they only sell their toothpaste and soap bars in China. But toothpaste and soap bars are not defined as “cosmetics” in China and therefore Weleda is not required to test on animals.

Weleda explains its position on selling its toothpaste and soaps in China on their UK website, stating:

Is Weleda Sold in China?

I also asked them about post-market animal testing which is where Chinese officials will pull a beauty product off store shelves and test it on animals. This is often done without the company’s knowledge or consent. Weleda kindly responding by saying,

First of all, there is no reason to believe that our soaps and dental care products would be subject to after-market testing in shops, since they are in no way classified as products (such as cosmetics) for which animal testing is seen as necessary by the Chinese authorities. We know that these products are not subject to testing based on our local contacts, and this has also been confirmed to us by a representative of Humane Society International working in China, as well as the Institute for In Vitro Sciences, which collaborates with PETA. We follow regulatory developments in China closely, and we react immediately to any developments. If the current situation should change, any affected products would immediately be withdrawn from the Mainland Chinese market.Our presence in China has always been small, but we do think that it is worth being there if it means that we can spread awareness of the benefits of natural cosmetics, and meet the needs of Chinese consumers for this type of product. We would not be selling any product in China if we had reason to believe that animals would be hurt because of this.”

Cruelty-Free Policies

Note that there is no legal definition for the label ‘Cruelty-Free.’ It can mean different things to different people. But Cruelty-Free is generally used to imply no animal testing. More specifically, the ingredients, formulation, or finished product are not tested on animals at any stage of product development.

At ethical elephant, we always assess a company’s cruelty-free policy using our Cruelty-Free Checklist. This ensures no animal testing was performed by the brand itself, its suppliers, and by any third parties.

Also, note that Cruelty-Free and Vegan don’t always mean the same thing.

Weleda is Not 100% Vegan

‘Vegan’ in cosmetics can refer to an entire brand that is 100% Vegan or a specific product is vegan.

In the case of Weleda, not all of their products are vegan. But they have some products that are suitable for vegans.

How to know which of Weleda products are vegan?

All of Weleda’s vegan products are clearly marked on their website.

The following is a screenshot of what’s currently stated on Weleda’s website about its vegan claims:

Weleda Vegan Claims

Vegan Policies

Similar to ‘Cruelty-Free,’ there is no standard or legal definition for the label ‘Vegan.’ But it’s usually used in the context to describe something that doesn’t contain any animal-derived ingredients or animal by-products.

Some common animal products used in cosmetics include carmine, lanolin, snail mucus, beeswax, honey, pearl or silk-derived ingredients, animal-based glycerin, keratin, and squalene.

There are plant-based and synthetic alternatives to animal-derived ingredients. But it’s sometimes difficult to know with certainty whether a product is vegan just by reading the ingredient list.

So it’s best to ask the company and manufacturers to ensure the ingredients they’ve chosen to use were from non-animal sources.

Where are Weleda’s products made?

I asked Weleda where their products are manufactured and they told me:

“Weleda’s three main sites are close together, with our headquarters in Arlesheim, Switzerland just a few kilometres from the Weleda site in Huningue, France. The production operation in Schwäbisch Gmünd near Stuttgart is just 250 kilometres north-east in Germany.”


I hope this article helped you to understand Weleda’s cruelty-free and vegan status and by choosing cruelty-free together, we can help end animal testing for cosmetics once and for all!

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What do you think

15 thoughts on “Weleda”

  1. They sound like they’re just trying to give “the right answer.” Was going to buy their deodorant because the ingredients look clean, but I’m gonna pass on them. No animal’s life is worth my armpit comfort.

  2. Susie Fairgrieve

    If you research it fully you will find out that in China toothpastes and soaps are not categorised as ‘cosmetics’ so they are exempt from the animal testing requirements.

    1. What concerns me is the issue of post-market surveillance testing and how the Chinese authorities can just take any product off the shelf and test it on animals without telling or asking the company. And I can imagine this is quite difficult to monitor when selling your products in a foreign country.

      I think it would give us all a peace of mind if there was a third party, like Leaping Bunny, verifying and looking into Weleda’s animal testing claims. I heard they were looking into becoming certified CF soon…so until then, I’m personally just a bit wary of simply taking their word for now!

      I really do hope they get certified cruelty-free sooner rather than later! =)

  3. Can anyone confirm this yet?
    Although I’m not a vegan myself, my partner is, and I do my upmost to buy products that are truly cruelty-free.
    Weleda’s vague statements don’t clarify anything and will potentially fool customers. That, to me, is not what a respectable company should do.
    Until I know otherwise I won’t be buying their products.

  4. Hi Vicky,

    I work at Weleda in Switzerland and I just came across your article. I’m really sorry if our comments on this topic have come across as being vague. That hasn’t been our intention at all. I can assure you that we do our utmost to make sure that the products that we sell in China do not risk being tested on animals.

    Please allow me to clarify:

    First of all, there is no reason to believe that our soaps and dental care products would be subject to after-market testing in shops, since they are in no way classified as products (such as cosmetics) for which animal testing is seen as necessary by the Chinese authorities. We know that these products are not subject to testing based on our local contacts, and this has also been confirmed to us by a representative of Humane Society International working in China, as well as the Institute for In Vitro Sciences, which collaborates with PETA. We follow regulatory developments in China closely, and we react immediately to any developments. If the current situation should change, any affected products would immediately be withdrawn from the Mainland Chinese market.

    Our presence in China has always been small, but we do think that it is worth being there if it means that we can spread awareness of the benefits of natural cosmetics, and meet the needs of Chinese consumers for this type of product. We would not be selling any product in China if we had reason to believe that animals would be hurt because of this.

    As for third-party certification, please allow me to point out that we are a European company. Our headquarters are based in Arlesheim, Switzerland, and all of our cosmetics are produced in Europe. Animal testing on cosmetics and their ingredients has been banned in the EU since 2013. Our company’s history goes back to 1921, and we have always had a policy of no animal testing on our cosmetics. Weleda is in fact a pioneer of the natural approach to cosmetics.
    For all of these reasons, it is true that we have been slow to consider adopting the kind of certification that would be well known outside of Europe, such as Leaping Bunny, which we do regret. However, we are currently certified by NATRUE, one of the strictest labels for natural and organic cosmetics. Admittedly, it is perhaps still not very well known outside of Europe. NATRUE does not permit animal testing on its cosmetics, and also has a policy against animal testing in China.

    I hope that I’ve been able to answer your questions – if you have any more, please let me know. This is a topic we take very seriously.

    1. Thanks for this information. However, I can’t seem to find information on NATRUE.ORG regarding their policies on animal testing. I have contacted them for further information. As a consumer I am disinclined, no matter how sincere a company’s statement may be, to simply trust what is stated without a reputable third party verification. Weleda seems to have outstanding products. Sadly, as a non EU consumer, I am not confident in continuing the use of Weleda products based on the information you’ve provided. Would you happen to have links to NATRUE’s requirements regarding animal testing?

  5. Kayleigh Diggle

    Brilliant response from the lady working for Weleda.. This article is crazy, to do so much research and not come across the fact Weleda are certified
    y NATRUE. Doh!

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